Feathers in the Breeze

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featherfoot1
I worked on this feather-inspired quilt off and on over the winter and finally finished it this summer. Why did it take so long? After running out of the quilt front background fabric, I found that it had been discontinued and was no longer available. :/ It took a while to find replacement fabric. Lesson learned: make sure to purchase enough fabric!

feather-front-bench

I admired Ana Maria Horner’s feather quilt, but wanted a scattered look. I used scraps from other projects to piece the feathers and binding and Lotta Jansdotter Nopp in Sky from the Mormor collection for the blue backing.
feather-back-bench

So far, this has been my favorite quilt project – – minus the long wait ;)
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feather-foot
Have a good week! – – Joanne

It’s 5 o’clock Somewhere

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It’s that time of year, again.  I must get back to school and lesson plans. So how much can we cram in a weekend?

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Spent time on the beach with George and Connor . . .
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Attended an outdoor soireé featuring Alison Glass with her handcrafted fabrics and quilt sample ideas . . .
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And made a tiki bar beer bottle opener for my friends. This was a very easy and quick project.

canopener-full

Supplies: 1″ x 6″ pine wood, drill and screws, drink bottle opener, 4 bottle caps, staple gun and staples, paint and brushes

How: Cut wood into 1) 22″ length for back, 2) 4.5″pieces for sides, 1) 4.5″ x  4.5″ piece for bottom  and 1) 4.5″ x  5.5″ piece for the front. 

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Attach front to sides with screws. Drill holes into the bottom for drainage. Then, screw through the back into each of the side pieces. Screw on bottom piece (from bottom-side up).

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Add decoration – there are a ton of design ideas online. I painted a clock face and attached bottle caps using a staple gun. Lastly, attach the bottle opener (ours came from Total Wine).

canopener-face

Remember, it’s always 5 o’clock somewhere  ; )  Have a good week! – – Joanne

Beach Cabanas and Hillibillies

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We are ‘smack dab’ in the middle of summer, as Grandmother Lillian would say. It’s a hot and lazy time of year; best spent at the shore.

Lillian Mae, Bathing Beauty, 1980(c)

Lillian Mae, Bathing Beauty, c. 1980

The nearby Bay and Ocean were my inspiration for this quilted cabana-themed table runner.  

beach cabana 1

Cabanas are not used in our locale, so I had to scour the internet for images. From what I gather, “cabaña” originates from Spain and means “a small cabin or tent-like structure used as a bath house, especially on a beach or by a swimming pool.”

cabana table

Oh my goodness, we are such hillbillies. We just show up in our swimsuits, beach chair and blankets, drinks and snacks, sand buckets and shovels and have at it.  Buuuut, if  we did have a cabana, perhaps we wouldn’t cart home almost enough sand to fill a small sand box.  :) 

cabana close

Have a good week! – – Joanne

Blackberry and Blueberry Jam

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Only the ridiculous go blackberry or blueberry picking during 102ºF heat index weather. Right. So, what to do with buckets of plump, sweet berries? Share with family and friends, freeze for future recipes and . . . jam making! Here are two similar and easy recipes for blackberry and blueberry jam. Hope you enjoy!

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BLACKBERRY JAM
8-10 washed and dried 8 ounce canning jars and lids
4 cups crushed blackberries
6 1/2 cups sugar
3 ounces pectin

Wash canning jars and lids by hand or in dishwasher, keep warm. Rinse and drain blackberries.

Measure sugar into a bowl and set aside.

Use a potato masher to crush the blackberries.

blkberry-smash

Place crushed blackberries into a stock pot on medium heat, bring to a rolling boil, stirring frequently. Slowly add pectin, while stirring and let boil for one minute.

blkberry-stirboil

Add the sugar, all at once to the pot, while stirring. Let simmer for ten minutes.

Fill canning jars, leaving 1/4″ space at top. Wipe excess off edges of jar. Seal tightly with plate and lid, return to water pot and boil jars ten more minutes. Place jars on a level surface and let cool 24 hours.

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BLUEBERRY JAM
8-10 washed and dried 8 ounce canning jars and lids
4 cups crushed blueberries
2 tablespoons lemon juice
5 1/4 cups sugar
3 ounces pectin

Wash the canning jars and lids by hand or in the dishwasher, keep warm. Rinse and drain the blueberries.

Measure sugar into a bowl and set aside.

Use a potato masher to crush the blueberries. Place crushed blueberries into a stock pot on medium heat, add lemon juice and stir. Bring pot to a rolling boil while stirring frequently.

Slowly add the pectin, while stirring, and boil for one minute.

Add sugar, all at once to the pot, while stirring. Let simmer for ten minutes.

Fill canning jars, leaving 1/4″ space at top. Wipe excess off edges of jar. Seal tightly with plate and lid, return to water pot and boil jars for ten more minutes. Place jars on a level surface and cool 24 hours.

Bon appétit!

I spy George picking blueberries

I spy George picking blueberries

Have a good week! – – Joanne

Dog Days of Summer Dog Bed

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When it’s hot outside, you just want to cool off and take it easy.

Phoebebed

Made of scrap lumber and discounted chair pads; our pups, Pearl (rescue beagle), Douley and Phoebe Darling (Boston terrors) absolutely LOVE their new beds!

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How did we make them?

Screw 2X2′ and 2X3′ lengths into a frame, shorter lengths to the inside

Frame A

Screw the 2X2′ support brace in middle of frame, 2″ below lip

Screw the four 12″ feet inside frame, 2″ below lip. The feet act as addition bed supports

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Cut plywood to fit inside frame, on top of feet and support brace – you may need to trim to make it fit

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Drill drain holes in plywood bed, about 3″ apart

Add a patio chair pad, or bedding of choice. The 2″ drop below the lip helps keep the pad in place

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Supplies:

  • 2X6″ pressure treated board, cut in two 3′ lengths (sides)
  • 2X6″ pressure treated board, cut in three 2′ lengths (sides, support brace)
  • 4X4″ pressure treated post, cut in 12″ lengths (feet)
  • 2X3′ pressure treated plywood (bed)
  • outdoor patio chair pad
  • drill, screws

Our pups are so spoiled; they refuse to chase the squirrels!

Have a good week! – – Joanne

Farmhouse Dining Table

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George has an awesome gift: he can look at a photo (“I want it to look just like this”) and in turn, build whatever piece of furniture requested.  This gift came in handy as we helped our son-in-law and daughter paint and decorate their first new home these past few weeks. The one thing our daughter requested was for her dad to build a keepsake farmhouse dining table. 

The table was built from supplies left over from my craft table project, in addition to four traditional maple wood turned legs from Lowe’s and a lot of braces.  :)  

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Brianne and I painted the apron and legs a white chalk paint wash. Later, she applied Minwax Red Mahogany stain and a satin Minwax clear coat to the top.

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Wouldn’t this table look great paired with these half painted chairs? ;)

Have a good week! – – Joanne