TV Multimedia Console, Part 1

George and I spent the weekend helping our daughter and son-in-law build a TV-multimedia console.  Brianne and Brian found online plans that would suit their needs, but desired storage with more of a mid-century flair.

consoleonline

How to Specialist: How to Build a TV Stand

The inspiration choices were narrowed down. However, it still wasn’t quite what they had in mind. They didn’t want all the wiring and electronics exposed, but were concerned about enclosing heat-producing electronics.

consoleinspire2

consoleinspire1

A trip to Home Depot solved the dilemma. The solution was to insert radiator sheeting in the doors and cut ventilation into the back of the unit. In addition, the legs were switched out for round 5.5 inch wood turned legs reminiscent of the Mad Men era.  

The console is basically a wood rectangular box with a divider and shelves.  A channel was routed into the doors in which to inlay the radiator sheet. A center divider holds up shelving for the variety of electronics. 

IMG_3181

IMG_3175

IMG_3178

IMG_3183

Brianne started staining the console doors, but isn’t sure if she likes the color. 

img_74941.jpg

This project will have to wait until another weekend. That leaves time to attach the legs and muddle over the stain/paint matter. 🙂

Have a good week! – – Joanne

 

Snow on the Brain

Snow on the brain. Friday, students couldn’t concentrate with the 8″ to 15″ forecast of snow for the weekend.  I had the 5-year-old students measure varying snow depths on a meter stick. Their eyes! Most had never experienced a local snow. 

Weathermen foamed on about the upcoming blizzard; grocery store shelves emptied of breads, eggs, milk; everyone decided they needed gas – even though warned not to drive during the storm. My sister and I waited in the snow party line at the ABC (liquor) store. Snowmageddon.

img_3043

Sunday afternoon. We’ve about binge-watched all that Netflix has to offer. I’ve sewed an entire quilt top. We’ve sweat pant-ed, hot cocoa-ed, fudge brownie-ed ourselves to the extreme. No school tomorrow; maybe not on Tuesday. 

img_1873

I’m not complaining. I rather like sleeping in. Think I’ll make chili and cornbread tonight. Oh, yeah . . . I have a bottle of Bailey’s.

img_1879

Stay warm! – – Joanne

 

 

Veterans Day for Students

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on November 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and November 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938.  Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans–living or dead–but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime. —History.com

Living in a military town you can’t go very far before stumbling upon one of the bases. The majority of students who attend my school has one (if not both) parent in the military.  So, per tradition, today the school student-body walked over to the Veteran’s Day Parade on Atlantic Avenue. 

vetday16_ussalabama

Replica of the USS Alabama

vetday16_uniform

Then and Now Uniforms

vetday16_history

WWII Dispatch Rider – Indian or Harley-Davidson?

vetday16_fire

Honoring ALL Service Members

vetday16_hsecurity

Homeland Security – A Little Levity

vetday16_redhorse

Airmen, Virginia Air National Guard, 203rd Red Horse Squadron suffered one of the worst peacetime loss of life in the Virginia National Guard since WWII in 2001

By far, my parade favorites are the high school marching bands with their boisterous renditions. 😀 I hope you enjoy this short collage of high school bands. There’s just something about hometown parades!

vetday16_video

Enter a caption

Whether you commemorate Veterans Day, Armistice Day or Remembrance Sunday – thank you for your service.

vetday16_carriage

With gratitude – – Joanne

 

source:
History.com Staff. “Veterans Day Facts.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2009. Web. 11 Nov. 2016.

Non-Event in Virginia

On Friday, October 7, my school held it’s annual fall mile run event on the boardwalk.  A front was moving in from the west, coinciding with winds from Hurricane Matthew, which was curving east and heading out into the Atlantic.  At least, that was what the National Hurricane Center and our local weathermen were predicting.  The skies looked ominous, but not atypical of local frontal storms.  The students ran their mile with the wind slowing their times.

img_2635

something’s brewing

 

img_2637

blowing sand forming ridges

Continue reading

Grandaddy’s and Grandma’s House

My grandparent’s, John Glenn and Lillian, moved back to the States into this home after an Army career that took them all over the world. This would be the last home that John, known as Glenn, and Lillian would live in together. Their children, grandchildren and great grandchildren loved to visit them often. An opportunity arose and my sister had the option  to purchase my Grandparent’s home, having been out of the family’s purview for several years.

John Glenn & Lillian Mae

John Glenn & Lillian Mae

Built in 1919, the old girl was showing her age. Situated in Ocean View, in close proximity to the Chesapeake Bay, she is an Arts and Crafts bungalow, with an additional bedroom added in the 1950’s.  Massive oak trees once shaded the house. She has gone through many changes over the years. 

Continue reading

2015: A Pretty Good Year Afterall

 

2015. Hmmm. . .  It started with snow. A lot. We played rustic in a tiny cabin. In more snow. 🙂  My family was healthy. George retired. Summer was idyllic. I learned how to preserve blueberries. Concerned about cut-backs at work, I promoted an online shop featuring quilts and assorted vintage collectibles. Even with some fantastically hectic days, I was able to fulfill holiday orders on time. I acquired a new past-time; walking through a nearby maritime forest, which has proven to be quite restorative from the weekday rush.  All in all, it was a good year. . . And it ended with humid, 80°F (27°C) weather. The botanicals are very confused.

My 2015 year in photo review:

cabin 1

Crabtree Falls, Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia

 

Continue reading